Election 2019 in Canada: A Change Agenda Protected…

By Denis Bright  Canadians voted to continue a reformist agenda with a minority…

Brand Trudeau Wins a Second Term

“Brand Trudeau is: ‘Welcome to the new politics, just like the old…

The HMT Dunera scandal (part 2)

By Dr George Venturini  By the end of the second world war the…

The enemies of free speech

By Kathryn  The unspeakable, blatant ultra-right-wing bias of the Murdoch press in favour…

Is Labor doomed for oblivion, or can Albo…

Bill Shorten took over as leader of Australian Labor Party in 2013…

Equine Hypocrisies: Racehorses for the Knackery

It was always a probable fact: the dark consequences of having what…

Government Funding and the Free Press

By Jay Smith  In the domain of politics and state government, the relationship…

Protest tactics matter

By 2353NM  Those that demonstrated around the world for ‘Extinction Rebellion’ recently have…

«
»
Facebook

YouTube Censorship and The Battle of Ideas

The latest so-called Adpocolypse has hit YouTube. This refers to a crackdown on the advertisements (and thus monetisation) available to content creators. I want to provide some background for this and then wrestle with a problem that I think this crackdown creates.

The origins: Steven Crowder and Carlos Maza 

Carlos Masa is a journalist working for Vox, and Crowder calls himself a comedian. In recent years, Crowder has repeatedly attacked Maza, who is gay, calling him, among other things, a ‘lispy queer’. You see the sort of man Crowder is. Maza accused youtube of hypocrisy for allowing Crowder to use their platform while claiming to support Pride Month. You can see his point, even if it is not possible for the company to monitor everything that is posted. Maza also demanded that youtube act against Crowder for his homophobic slurs and attacks on him.

It should be noted that while homophobia is abhorrent, simply using the words ‘queer’ or ‘fag’ or any other slur, does not amount to a crime. These are, as George Carlin said, only words. Allowing words to have power over us is a show not of strength, but of insecurity. Unless and until someone advocates violence, or does libel or slander, you are free to say basically anything. That includes, as much as I do not like it, hate speech. Allow me to be absolutely clear on this point with an extreme example. You can say ‘I hate the Jews’ as much as you like, but the moment you say ‘kill the Jews’ we have a problem. The latter is a call to violence, the former is not.

The Marketplace of Ideas, Part One

As much as I disagree with what he said, Crowder should not have been de-platformed (which he was not). It would strike a considerable double standard to take Crowder down when IS massacres and other highly violent content is on YouTube. Also, not to violate the slippery slope fallacy, but if you censor content because someone used words that someone else found offensive, that sets one hell of a precedent. Somebody’s feelings dictating what happens to a YouTube channel? If the purpose of this platform was to be a bathroom wall, where anything could be written, then stick to that.

The exceptions to this are, as I said above, limited, but clearly, anything that is actually illegal needs to be policed. I refer here to rape, child pornography and other such heinous and depraved acts. If these videos are found, they should be removed. The difference between the content just described and bigoted words should be clear: the former are crimes, the latter is not. But what do we do about other so-called ‘controversial content’? What of 9/11 ‘truthers’, or Sandy Hook ‘truthers’ and other such conspiracy nuts? What of the JFK assassination conspiracy? I will return to this at the end, but what of climate science denial? Or anti-vaccination advocates? Who defines what content is controversial (and why), and should a corporation (or the government for that matter) have that kind of power?

YouTube’s Reaction

YouTube’s response was curious, to say the least: Crowder was not de-platformed, but his videos were demonetised. An odd half-measure to say the least: we cannot actually take him down, but we will remove ads from his videos. But it did not stop there. In their search for ‘hateful content’, YouTube demonetised channels which track extremism and even targeted a history channel because it displayed and discussed Nazi propaganda from a historical perspective. It is clear that a form of a dragnet is in place here, and context is being utterly ignored. Youtube seemingly cannot tell the difference between the discussion of hateful content and the approving display of said content. This is why you do not place a computer algorithm in charge of content regulation. YouTube’s official policy and plans for the future can be found here.

The Marketplace of Ideas, Part Two: A Personal Quandary

I asked above what is to be done about content that is at odds with the available facts. On this issue, I am torn. On the one hand, people can say what they like (short of the usual caveats). But on the other hand, ideas that are demonstrably false and/or dangerous (climate science denial and anti-vax) have no place in public discourse. These ideas include creationism, flat earth, and trickle-down economics. All of these are based on lies and should not to be legitimised (even if intentionally) by being discussed alongside the facts. We are not required, to paraphrase Bill Maher, to balance the facts with the anti-facts.

Is this a form of intellectual fascism that punishes ‘wrong think’ by removing it from the discussion? Perhaps it is, and hence the quandary. That said, as long as there is debate over issues that involve facts that can be known there will be no progress. As long as the right (and it usually is the right) can create this false equivalence between the facts and the anti-facts, we are stuck.

It is for this reason that I decried the ‘debate’ between Bill Nye the Science Guy and Ken Ham. One is a scientist who is backed in his views by every field of scientific study, and the other believes in myths contained in a bronze age book. Putting these men on the same stage creates an equivalence between them that is not justified.

Conclusion

Let us relate this back to YouTube. It is unclear where this would lead, but part of me supports removing non-fact-based content where there are known facts. You may be entitled to your own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. Whether it is the whole ‘race-IQ’ sector or some other anti-fact nonsense that serves no other purpose but to poison the discourse, progress matters more than your opinion.

To end on a lighter note, I am aware of the irony of saying progress matters more than your opinion as I give my opinion.

 

Like what we do at The AIMN?

You’ll like it even more knowing that your donation will help us to keep up the good fight.

Chuck in a few bucks and see just how far it goes!

Donate Button

3 comments

Login here Register here
  1. Nato

    I never want to think of myself as a “grammar nazi” former and latter are used incorrectly here. Edit quickly.

  2. king1394

    We will always be safer when the range of views and opinions are out in the open. Censorship drives ideas into the dark where they don t get addressed or argued but where they fester and grow, and ultimately come to influence those who have little scepticism. The Nye/Ham debate exposed those who listened to a range of ideas and no doubt some rusted-on religionists were impressed by Ham, but I suggest that the majority of the audience for this would have benefited from hearing Nye’s rational arguments. To paraphrase Voltaire, I may not like what they say, but it must be permitted to be said.

  3. Michael Taylor

    Four times I posted a link to this article on Twitter, and on each occasion it was removed almost instantly. By Twitter, I am to assume.

    On those instances I’d tagged other people and added commentary.

    The fifth time I just posted the link to the article … and it worked.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Return to home page
Scroll Up
%d bloggers like this: