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Tag Archives: education. Liberals.

One Sign Of Intelligence Is Being Able To Change Your Mind or Why Scott Morrison Is Einstein!

Remember just a few years ago when we were told that we needed to be “energy agnostic”. Well, all that’s out the window. Apparently we now have to build a church to gas because the private operators have decided that they’d rather invest in something profitable.

Why do I call it “a church”? That’s because – like a church – it will be large and unused for much of the time and in future generations people will look at it and go, “Wow, what a large structure. I wonder why they spent so much money and something with no practical purpose. They must have really believed that someone would reward them in the next life!” (In the case of the Coalition, that’s Life After Politics!)

It’s very tempting to point out that once we took it for granted that governments would be responsible for building the infrastructure that enabled us to generate energy, but we were told by the Liberal Party that private industry was a lot better at it and market forces would make the whole thing a lot more efficient. Now we’re being told that the market has failed because the market relies on making a profit and nobody in private industry is keen to build a gas-fired power station for the simple reason that it’s not economically viable.

Of course, I shouldn’t criticise the Liberals for changing their mind and completely repudiating their free market principles and totally embracing socialism. After all, it’s only the intelligent who can change their minds. At least I think that’s true…

Whatever, the Liberals are certainly good at changing their minds. Sometimes they’ll even do it from one interview to the next.

Remember when they told us that people don’t need the government making decisions for them and that individuals were best placed to decide what to spend their money on… Of course, this was before they realised that once they got the Indue card out and accepted, they could eventually roll it out to pensioners and then the rest of us and we could only shop at approved Liberal donor stores.

Remember when Scotty was all about opening up the borders but then he saw how successful various state premiers were with their border closures. Now he’s determined to keep Australia’s borders closed until… well, it’s not like he intends to set a date because targets are for the accountable. We can’t say when borders will be open again, even with the majority vaccinated. As he put it: “Even in that circumstance, you’re talking about many Australians, millions of Australians, who wouldn’t have been vaccinated. Because A, they’re children or B, they’ve chosen not to be [vaccinated].” Unvaccinated children a concern? Is this different from “Schools are safe, I can’t be any clearer than that!” Too right it is, which just shows the intelligence of the man because he’s apparently changed his mind.

Remember when they labelled that ad about the vaccines with the Liberal Party logo? Well there’s another example of them changing their mind. Now they want bipartisan support for the rollout. Surely, Labor have to take part responsibility. Why? Well, they said that the logo shouldn’t be there because it was the government who were providing the vaccines and aren’t Labor an alternative government?

And then we have the NDIS which just a couple of Budgets ago was so awash with funds that Josh Frydenberg could take $4.7 billion from it to put us into surplus. While at $4.7 billion, those “Back In Black” coffee seemed overpriced, that’s nothing compared to the unsustainable nature of the NDIS now. We need to stop those “empathetic public servants” from giving wheelchairs to people. Everyone needs to stand on their own two feet even if they have no legs. Yes, social media was very cruel and mocked Linda Reynolds about her heart condition, but even she agrees that’s better than being awash with empathy like those public servants who fail to push those on the NDIS to get better. Our PM does believe in miracles, as we all know.

And Scotty’s changed his mind on debt and deficit too. We’re going to have deficits for the next ten years according to #Scottyfromannouncements. Yes, ok, Hockey said that the Liberals would deliver a surplus in their first year of government and every year thereafter but they changed their mind about that, as well as Hockey being Treasurer. And about having a stable government who didn’t change Prime Ministers. Of course it would be unfair to bring up how the Liberals changed their minds about Abbott’s rolled gold maternity leave, because that’s so many Prime Ministers ago.

Some of you will be expecting that I’ll also be pointing out the PM’s changing his mind on electric vehicles, but apparently he hasn’t. He told us that he never mocked EVs in the lead up to the 2019 election. No, no, he was complaining about Bill Shorten ruining the weekend by simply being PM and that would have ruined the weekend of everyone who mattered so EVs had nothing to do with it.

Yes, I can certainly recommend that you vote for Scott Morrison in the upcoming election which he assures won’t be held until next year, so I’d expect it in about three months. Even if you don’t like his policies and what he announces, there’s a better than fifty percent chance that they’ll never be implemented and that he’ll change them before the month is out. You can be content knowing that if you don’t like, for example, his intention to build a gas-fired power station, that once they’ve bought the land from the Liberal donor, and once they’ve spent a few million on consultants, they’ll change their mind and sell the land to a firm who wants to make electric vehicles or develop it for social housing.

I suppose you’ve noticed that lately, Mr Morrison seems to have a booklet in hands every time he appears in the media. Perhaps he’s working on the next slogan. “Liberals: We Have A Plan AND a Pamphlet.”

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If it’s good enough for the Arts, is it good enough for Education?

 

“Arts Minister George Brandis has defended moves to block government funding for organisations that unreasonably refuse corporate sponsorship following the “preposterously unreasonable” termination of Transfield’s sponsorship of the Sydney Biennale.

“Senator Brandis also indicated that any ”commercially sound” company, including tobacco companies, should not be ruled out for arts sponsorship.

“Senator Brandis has written to the Australia Council asking it to develop a policy that would deny funding to events or artists that refuse private sponsorship after the Biennale board severed ties with Transfield over its involvement in processing asylum seekers offshore.

“Senator Brandis said on Friday that while it was reasonable for arts companies or festivals to reject corporate funding if they had concerns about a sponsor’s financial credentials, it was not reasonable for them to refuse sponsorship on political grounds.”

The Sydney Morning Herald, March 14th 2014

Scene – A Primary School. The School Council is meeting.

Principal – Good evening, before we deal with the other items on our agenda, I’d like to introduce Mr Point who’s a representative from the Federal Government whose here to talk to us about our recent grant for the new multipurpose centre. Mr Point over to you.

Point – Thanks. Well, it’s clear you don’t need any money from us, so we’re not going to give you the grant.

Mr Wall – What?

Point – You refused a sponsorship deal. And it’s not the first time. We’ve checked your records.

Mr Wall – Is this about our refusal to let an alcohol company name the multipurpose centre?

Point – They’re the ones who brought it to out attention, but we have discovered that there were a number of others as well.

Mrs Mitchell – But we didn’t feel it appropriate to have what’s essentially alcohol advertising in a primary school.

Point – Our new guidelines are quite clear. No refusal of funding on political grounds.

Mr Wall – But an alcohol company? In a primary school?

Point – Why not? If it’s good enough for the Australian Cricket Team…

Mrs Mitchell – But we’re a primary school!

Point – So?

Mrs Mitchell – We have young children!

Point – I am aware of what a primary school does. Do you think I’m stupid?

Mr Jones – So, if we take the money from them, does that mean we still get the Federal Grant.

Point – Well, I’d like to say yes, but like I said, you’ve rejected funding from a few other companies as well.

Mr Jones – Such as?

Point – Several fast food chains allege that you wouldn’t allow them to place signs in the canteen or to pay for billboards in your car park.

Mr Wall – That’s a healthy eating decision, that’s hardly political.

Point – Healthy eating not political? How do you figure that?

Mrs Mitchell – So if we allow the billboards and signs and the alcohol company, do we receive the funding?

Point – That’s a good start. But I’m afraid that the fast food companies would require teachers to point out that it’s easier and cheaper just get to takeaway whenever they hold a cooking class. And Sanmonto have expressed concern that they’ve been excluded your garden project with the Grade 5’s. And Skittish Tobacco have complained that you refused to meet with them.

Principal – But they’re a tobacco company. They’re not even allowed to advertise.

Point – They didn’t want to advertise, they just wanted to run a health campaign.

Mrs Mitchell – On what?

Point – On the advantages of having role models amongst your peers whose behaviour is worth copying no matter what your parents say.

Mrs Mitchell – That’s it? If all do all that, will we still get the funding? We don’t have to give space to the local brothel?

Point – Have they asked?

Mrs Mitchell – Of course not!

Point – Yes, if you do all that, we won’t stop the funding. But keep in mind for future reference that no business should be refused any opportunity for purely political reasons.

Principal – Well, that’s a great relief. If nobody has any questions we’ll move on to our assistant principal who has an update on concerns that the Australian Curriculum has become too political.

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