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Tag Archives: Bob Carr.

Exposing the lie of politics

Image courtesy of tomohalloran.com

Image courtesy of tomohalloran.com

It is no surprise that when it comes to trust, collectively politicians rate very lowly. And individually there are many politicians that we definitely do not trust. Yet they continue to win our votes, if not our trust. In this guest post, Sir Scotch looks at this baffling phenomenon.

The well-known and quite rightly often maligned Readers Digest, over several years, have surveyed Australians, for the 50 professions they trust most. The list goes like this from the 2013 survey:

1. Firefighters 26. Builders
2. Paramedics 27. Alternative health practitioners
3. Rescue volunteers 28. Plumbers
4. Nurses 29. Mechanics
5. Pilots 30. Accountants
6. Doctors 31. Shop assistants
7. Pharmacists 32. Truck drivers
8. Veterinarians 33. Charity collectors
9. Air traffic controllers 34. Professional sportspeople
10. Farmers 35. Bankers
11. Scientists 36. Financial planners
12. Armed Forces personnel 37. Airport baggage handlers
13. Police 38. Clergy (all religions)
14. Dentists 39. Lawyers
15. Teachers 40. Tow-truck drivers
16. Childcare workers 41. CEOs
17. Flight attendants 42. Taxi drivers
18. Bus/Train/Tram drivers 43. Journalists
19. Locksmiths 44. Talkback radio hosts
20. Hairdressers 45. Real estate agents
21. Postal workers 46. Sex workers
22. Waiters 47. Call centre staff
23. Computer technicians 48. Insurance salespeople
24. Security guards 49. Politicians
25. Cleaners 50. Door-to-door salespeople

What does the list say about us as a country, as voters and as human beings? What are we able to learn from the way people vote, compared to the way people give credit, to people who would generally interact with them at some stage in their lives, though not necessarily, all that often, that politicians are only above door to door salesmen in those “trusted professions”?

Likewise, the most trusted people list, has several politicians in it, and that really is what we are about here. Why do Australians vote for folk they don’t trust, enough to admit to a survey taker, that they don’t trust them?

The first on the list is Malcolm Turnbull, at number 68, who is more trusted than Julian Assange. A funny outcome considering the normalcy of us, as voters expecting politicians to also be liars, since the two go hand in hand, and on any reading of the work of Julian Assange, who if one is to be completely fair, is the exact opposite, despite what is said by Rupert Murdoch and his tame typists, doing everything they are told.

It was Assange who brought to us the actual truth of the governments we elect in terms of their activities, after having spent years being told by politicians what they think we want to hear. Kevin Rudd appears just after Assange, again, a supreme obfuscator and liar, certainly in league with the Murdochracy, yet his trust rating is below that of Assange. Do punters actually know what Assange represents or are they dependant on the lies of the tame tabloid typists? The answer to that in simple terms appears to be a resounding “yes”. Without Murdoch and his co-conspirators, we are uninformed as a country. What a worrying situation!

Worrying, I’m thinking? Perhaps that’s why ethical politicians feel some control over media access makes sense.

Less ethical politicians of course, who tend to pop off to New York on the Murdoch cheque account, from both sides of the political divide it has to be said, don’t see it as an issue if the only paper/s in a whole state, come from one single self-absorbed egotistical octogenarian nabob, who isn’t even an Australian, (to avoid taxes not because of some high moral objection to Australian law or system), and the punters (you and me it could be said but I don’t buy his bullshit rags), is the framing device used to manage the entire Australia Conversation. And we accede to this? We are fools. Another correspondent a couple of weeks ago took me to task on the subject of the hyper generalisation inherent in “we get/have the government we deserve”. I have thought long and hard about how to assuage his disquiet at my generalisation, especially when I talked about the “water cooler conversation”, when we who see ourselves as “activist” in terms of our displeasure at the work of that failed priest currently occupying The Lodge, are given an opportunity to actually have a say to colleagues about the state of the nation.

My view is we don’t care to expose our distrust in case someone reports us to the boss, or holds us up as “agitators”, though in reality, that is what we need to be. We need to expose the negativity of a government for the corporations, such as we have had since Paul Keating first wound a French clock in an Armani double-breaster.

Lincoln, at Gettysburg opined, “. . . and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” But what are we, Australia, left with of that great hope?

Government by people we don’t trust, of people they don’t know, for people they don’t care enough about, to listen to, or ask what do we want from them. And we fail to call them to account!

Rather in secret little circles in darked back rooms in carefully managed blogs and fora, we cry out for “justice” but fail to act for those afflicted in PNG as a direct result or our inaction. We call for transparency, but ask little of the plans for the “TPP”, which stands ready to strip away more of our rights as members and citizens of a sovereign state. We ask for honesty, and then vote for Clive Palmer “because he offers some alternative to conservative politics”. I am yet to see an example of that.

We lie to ourselves as Australians. We lie to others, wearing the same cloak of humanity we had earned after Vietnam, failing to see the similarities between two wars fought for the US, with no other purpose, than to feed the industro-military swamp, which is the American economy.

Even our national anthem is a lie, but we still sing it at the football. We are afraid of change, a normal state for a conservative voter.

We are afraid of the pitfalls a new direction may bring. We are afraid of everything, but we still vote for people we don’t trust, who have proven themselves to be liars, time after time, we allow the same biumvirate of accession to the will of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue to “guide” us on our way to hell.

Some vote Green, but the vote is meaningless we are told, even though almost 12% of the population vote for them. Why is the 12% so meaningless? Labor gets into bed with Bob Brown and
others with ethics and vision, and are immediately held up as some sort of traitors. But no one, even Antony Greene, of the ABC, can explain why that vote is wasted.

It appears to me that there is seems no offence that can be committed by our current government and opposition, which can be held up as an example of outrageous and egregious conduct. We are now seeing some of the minutiae of the goings-on in foreign affairs in the Carr/Gillard regime, where it was important enough to diarise that the carrier of choice had the effrontery to not provide pyjamas. We find the old Foreign Minister holds himself up as the success of the day when Australia got a spot on the Security Council of the United Nations. He fails to mention in his memoir that the process of getting that seat took longer than the time that the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd process was in play, but is happy to accept responsibility.

I am moved to remember, that Rudd himself also held up his hand as being responsible. All lies.

So we’re left with the question “what does the government have to do to get to a point where Australia realises that we’ve been had?” The short answer is exactly what they are doing now, without having to worry about the question being asked in the first place.

At what point will Australians realise that government is not being conducted for them, for their families, for their futures, for their country or for much else with anything approaching value. Government is in fact being conducted for the betterment of United States corporate interests and the re-election of the main offenders and little else.

 

Breaking news – someone said something to someone

Photo from noisyroom.net

Here’s some breaking news! (Photo from noisyroom.net)

In breaking news, it’s been revealed that privately Julia Gillard is backing Kevin Rudd. An unnamed source today claimed that a New Limited reporter had told him that in private conversations, Gillard had said she’d be voting for Rudd in any leadership challenge.

A spokesman for the Prime Minister refused to comment on speculation about private conversations which has lead many in the press to speculate about whether there is soon to be a challenge. This was confirmed today by an unnamed Fairfax journalist who said that he’d been speaking to other journalists, who were all concerned about the Government’s attempts to shut down free speech.

“This is a blatant attempt to stifle democracy. It’s far worse than when John Howard stacked the board of the ABC, or when Kennett said if it were up to him he’d sell it off” the journalist said. “I’m speaking on the condition of anonymity. I just think the way the Gillard Government stuffed up the passing of National Disability Scheme legislation last week, by allowing leadership speculation to dominate, well, they’re just not fit to run a media unit.”

Chris Uhlmann agreed that we could use his unnamed sources on the the condition that we spelled his name correctly and that we didn’t quote anything they’d actually said. Michelle Grattan said that it’s been clear for some time that no-one likes Julia. Other sources confirmed that the PM privately supported Bob Carr’s private thoughts, one even going as far as suggesting that, in private, Carr was actually thinking things that he hadn’t actually said. Another source, was sure that Carr was saying things that he hadn’t actually thought, while a third source denied that there was any thinking going on at all.

A key figure inside the Labor party assured everyone that Julia Gillard was supporting Rudd in private, but that publicly she felt she had to maintain loyalty to herself, but if there was a spill Rudd would receive everyone’s vote twice.

Meanwhile, a spokesman for Tony Abbott said there was no truth in the rumour that he and Malcolm Turnbull spent Valentine’s Day together, and had been seen holding hands in the corridors of Parliament House. “While it’s true that everyone in the Liberal Party loves each other, Malcolm and I are just good friends.”

A leadership spill is speculated to occur tomorrow, and on Thursday . . . Friday at the latest. If not Friday, certainly sometime before or after the next election.