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Rebuff to Donald Trump in the South Korean election result

By Denis Bright

The historic victory of President Moon Jae-in challenges the hegemony of saber-rattling as the conventional solution to over 60 years of tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

Despite public utterances in support of President Trump’s hardline on North Korea by the Federal LNP in Australia, a return to the Sunshine Policy as favoured by incoming President Moon is actually Australia’s preferred position.

It is also supported by key regional player powers China and Russia and probably privately by Prime Minister Abe’s government in Japan.

Too much is at stake on the Korean Peninsula to risk another war in defence of an unsatisfactory status-quo from the armistice of 1953.

The might of North Korea’s conventional forces so close to Seoul in South Korea carries the possibility that provoking Kim Jong-un might end in disaster.

Hopefully mainstream leaders on all sides of Australian politics will send a coded signal to President Trump by welcoming the election of President Moon. Whitlamesque responses from Bill Shorten and Senator Penny Wong would be highly appropriate while President Moon’s victory is still a highly topical discussion point.

50 Million People in South Korea do not need to be pawns in a horrible geopolitical game because the economic and military options for their future as favoured by the United States are appalling.

Like Singapore and the Philippines, South Korea is intrinsically a peaceful developmental state which gains no real benefits from its links to the key global military industrial complex.

The conventional wisdom that globalization requires all the social stabilizers to be destroyed to facilitate more favourable private global capital flows makes a mockery of democratic processes. The latest OECD data on the size of private net capital flows shows the ongoing difficulties faced by middle-ranking economies like South Korea and Australia.

Net Private Capital Flows ($US Billions)

The election of President Moon shows that slow recoveries from both the Asian Financial Crisis of 1997 and the wider Global Financial Crisis (GFC) have not snuffed out the politics of change and commitment to peaceful reunification of Korea on terms negotiated between Koreans on both sides of the DMZ along the 38th Parallel.

Denis Bright (pictured) is a registered teacher and a member of the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA). Denis has recent postgraduate qualifications in journalism, public policy and international relations. He is interested in promoting discussion to evaluate pragmatic public policies that are compatible with contemporary globalization. Denis will be travelling in Italy and France later this month.

 


25 comments

  1. paul walter

    Trump is nuts. He just sacked the FBI director Comey for continuing to do his job and investigate Trump’s links with Russia.

    Seriously, he is as nutty as the North Koreans. We need more Moon and Sunshine.

  2. Matters Not

    Trump has managed to unite the Republicans and the Democrats

    The decision stunned members of both parties, who saw it as a brazen act sure to inflame an already politically explosive investigation. For all his unconventional actions in his nearly four months as president, Mr. Trump still has the capacity to shock, and the notion of firing an F.B.I. director in the middle of such an investigation crossed all the normal lines.

    The move exposed Mr. Trump to the suspicion that he has something to hide and could strain his relations with fellow Republicans who may be wary of defending him when they do not have all the facts. Many Republicans issued cautious statements on Tuesday, but a few expressed misgivings about Mr. Comey’s dismissal and called for a special congressional investigation or independent commission to take over from the House and Senate Intelligence Committees now looking into the Russia episode.

    What’s this claim: the suspicion that he has something to hide. He is just following the precedent set by Nixon. And we know how that turned out.

    Perhaps he will call Turnbull as a character witness?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/09/us/politics/trump-fbi-investigation-nixon.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=a-lede-package-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

  3. paul walter

    I think it’s the behaviour of a would-be dictator.
    I can’t remember the like of it, even in US politics.
    He is as irrational as Kim Jong Un.
    Nuclear war is inevitable.

    Should be dragged out of the White House by his feet and detained at an asylum maximum security wing, restrained, straight-jacketed and dosed up with largactyl.

  4. Matters Not

    Perhaps it’s fake news?

    As for the Korean Peninsular and its immediate future. That’s a real worry.

    What’s it with these people with ridiculous ‘hair’?

  5. paul walter

    MN, I read about it earlier today and am still in stunned amazement at it.

    Remember the big irony. Comey made his name and the Donald’s presidency investigating the Clinton camp for connections with the Russians..

  6. Matters Not

    The editorials in the US are in meltdown. The Congress is in shock. Trump wants the separation of powers to be confined to the dustbin of history. I imagine the judiciary just can’t sit back and wait for their turn.

  7. paul walter

    Batman movies are rational by comparison.

  8. Kronomex

    “Hopefully mainstream leaders on all sides of Australian politics will send a coded signal…” Something about snowballs and hell would be apt here.

  9. Independent Australia

    Let’s see what our leaders have to say about this election result in South Korea. Do they have the courage of the Korean voters to say what we all think? The march to war is a deplorable agenda for any Australian leaders to follow. Let’s take heart from the Korean voters on the front-line of a ridiculous conflict about the ghosts of 1953. Are there any cracks in LNP ranks on this issue?

  10. Freetasman

    I just wonder if the Americans will adopt the new Venezuelan protest tactics using “poopootovs” and organising a “Shit March”

  11. Henry Rodrigues

    Matters not……… ‘call Turnbull as a character witness ‘ Surely you jest. The obsequious turd, who was last seen bowing and scraping and smiling, even as he was being rogered by that obnoxious fool and his accomplice, the crinkled scrote ??
    Spare us the vomit inducing scene.

  12. Michael Taylor

    A war with North Korea would just be soooo convenient for Trump. As would a war with anyone, actually, but North Korea is much more obliging.

    A war would be the ultimate distraction.

  13. paul walter

    Could be a useful distraction. If it spread at least he wouldn’t have to worry about dissent any more.

    Or the rest of us.

  14. Leila Smith

    Totally agree Denis, timely article and a ray of hope in our world, along with the election result in France

  15. Rubio@Coast

    Your spot on Michael Taylor. Trump has identity problems and wants his place in history. Watch out World for this type of personality and no respect for the so-called democratic leaders who go along with this deviant behaviour: Well over a million dead in the last Korean War: so who wants another episode when the security of the entire Korean Peninsula can be guaranteed by removing all weapons of mass destruction and opening up new land trading bridges.

  16. Matters Not

    Henry Rodrigues re:

    call Turnbull as a character witness ‘ Surely you jest

    I would like to think so. But who knows? After all Tony Abbott became the Prime Minister of Australia and Peter Dutton’s ambition to do the same is being entertained as well. As for Trump becoming the most powerful person in the world – what evidence do we need that the political world has gone completely mad.

    Re Trump and his latest. The Irish have an insightful take:

    There are three consequences. The first is that calls will mount to appoint a special prosecutor to take over the Russia investigation. …

    The second is that Mr Trump will now find it impossible to banish the Russia narrative. …

    The third consequence is how this will go down in Moscow. The Russian government has made little secret of its desire to contaminate US democracy.

    But I think there’s a fourth option: It’s all Labor’s fault. Word is that Turnbull was giving exactly that advice to Trump in that abbreviated conversation. But who knows. Everything is hilarious these days.

    http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/trump-s-tuesday-night-massacre-another-blow-for-american-democracy-1.3077960

    Bur seriously the analysis from The Irish Times is worth a read.

  17. Millie

    Is Trump seeking to become a military hero by using the 75 million people of the Korean Peninsula as his pawns?
    Time to end war games in Korea. Ironically few conservative politicians have a record of military service.
    Give peace a chance.

  18. Michael Taylor

    MN, the fourth option is only brought into calculations because of who our PM is. Being Turnbull, it is clearly Labor’s fault. If Abbott was our PM then it’d be the carbon tax. We all know the world-wide devastation caused by the carbon tax, and the equilibrium of the universe wasn’t restored until it was repealed. Abbott, single-handedly, prevented World Wars 3, 4, 5 and 6. And possibly 7.

  19. Henry Rodrigues

    Matters not… That IrishTimes article spells it out very clearly and concisely. Trump will surely destroy himself and his presidency and contaminate future administrations too. The germs of deception and outright partisanship will linger and spread throughout his government, because he has assembled around him some pretty nasty characters, like Jeff Sessions, Scott Pruitt, who are unashamed of their tea party style approach to domestic politics. It is a worry to the rest of the democracy that Trump and his merry men are prepared to throw every bit of commonsense to the wind. Putin is a product of the KGB, its tactics and goals are what drives him. Its in his DNA. He has manipulated and distorted the so-called democratic process in Russia by sheer thuggery and corruption, how else does he get to be ‘elected’ time and again with 97% approval. And Trump it seems is now beholden to Putin. And Turnbull kowtowing to this narcissistic bully is something we should all be ashamed and indeed wary of.

  20. Michael Taylor

    Henry, as an aside I’m impressed with some of the stuff that the Irish Times produces. When they cover Australian politics their articles make our local stuff look like fairytales made up in some kindergarten. Oh, wait. 😳

  21. Henry Rodrigues

    Michael Taylor…… I agree. Journalism is this country is a joke, but it wasn’t always so. The SMH was one of the best in the world a couple of decades ago. As for the crap that oozes out of Murdoch’s stables, its not worth commenting on. What is also worrying is that many people, mostly of the older sort, religiously and diligently, still choose to allow their judgement to be clouded and compromised by subscribing to Murdoch’s rags. Friends and acquaintances of my own, fall into that last category.

  22. silkworm

    Looking at Trump this morning, I noticed his hair has turned white, no doubt due to the stresses he is under. No more orange turnip. Sad.

  23. Michael Taylor

    silkie, didn’t that happen to Marie Antoinette? History rightly or wrongly tells us that her hair turned white after being captured trying to flee France.

    An omen, perhaps.

  24. Pat

    Did the Korean War solve anything? Give peace another chance!

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